By Elise Schadauer

Central Florida Pulmonary Group Offers Shape-HF
New, “no-stress” medical test is simple to take for even high-risk patients.

Orlando, FL — Shortness of breath is the primary reason patients visit the Central Florida Pulmonary Group (CFPG). 

“Shortness of breath could be a symptom of any number of different problems including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pulmonary hypertension, pulmonary fibrosis, lung cancer, heart disease, and others,” says Syed Mobin M.D. FCCP, FAASM, pulmonary disease specialist, critical care physician and sleep disorders practitioner at CFPG. “Evaluating shortness of breath can be difficult and complicated.”

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By Elise Schadauer

 

Devices on the Edge

A Gentler Heart Test

Shape Medical Systems, Inc.

by Katie Westfall

“Can you walk up a flight of stairs?” a cardiologist asks a chronic heart-failure patient in order to assess her heart and lung function. Then the doctor orders what is sometimes called a stress test, monitoring her heart while she takes a six-minute walk on a treadmill. This test can be very strenuous for some people; shortness of breath may have been the very symptom that brought them to the cardiologist’s office.

A new device, the Shape-HF Cardiopulmonary Testing System, from the St. Paul medical device company Shape Medical Systems, Inc., helps physicians determine a patient’s cardiopulmonary health in a less taxing way.

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By Elise Schadauer

Advance for Respiratory & Sleep Medicine published an article about Shape-HF for professionals in pulmonology, respiratory care and sleep on its website on September 5, 2010. Titled First Low-Intensity Medical Device to Objectively Quantify Cardiopulmonary Response to Exercise, the article goes on to describe how Shape-HF links measured functional performance and the physiology contributing to exercise limitation and dyspnea. Read the article.

By Elise Schadauer

Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN (July 14, 2010) -- Shape-HF is a new non-invasive, low-intensity cardiopulmonary exercise testing device used to assess functional status in patients showing symptoms of heart or lung disease. Exertional dyspnea is complex and arises from multiple neuromuscular, hormonal, myopathic, metabolic and psychogenic pathophysiologies. Shape-HF quantifies the severity of dyspnea and fatigue on exertion and evaluates the interaction between the heart, lungs, and other organ systems involved in oxygen uptake and transport. Functional tests performed at rest cannot reliably uncover the underlying mechanisms of exercise intolerance in patients with chronic cardiac or pulmonary disorders.

By Elise Schadauer

Minneapolis-St. Paul (April 15, 2010) – Shape Medical Systems, Inc. is pleased to announce its business relationship with Buffalo Supply, Inc. of Lafayette, Colorado, to provide the best negotiated prices to federal government hospitals for its Shape-HF Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing System.

By Elise Schadauer

Results Support Reproducibility, Sensitivity and Cardiopulmonary Measures

of Shape-HF as Compared to Research Level CPX System

Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN (March 10, 2010) – A recent study has shown that the Shape-HF Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing System accurately quantifies key cardiopulmonary variable over a range of workloads and has a coefficient of variation similar to a well validated system. The study was published this month in The Open Sports Medicine Journal.

By Elise Schadauer

Study Results Support Ventilatory Expired Gas Analysis at Low-Intensity Exercise

as Valuable Insight to Prognosis and Cardiac Stability in Heart Failure Patients

Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN (November 18, 2009) – The Journal of Cardiac Failure published results from a recent study showing that ventilatory expired gas analysis during a short bout of low-intensity exercise may provide insight into prognosis and cardiac stability in heart failure patients. Ventilatory efficiency and the partial pressure of end-tidal carbon dioxide, obtained during moderate to high levels of physical exertion, have been widely accepted to demonstrate prognostic value in heart failure. This study validates the method of testing at or below anaerobic threshold used with the Shape-HF™ Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing System, a new non-invasive medical device that assesses heart-lung interaction and ventilation in patients with chronic heart failure and other cardiopulmonary disease’s method of testing at or below the anaerobic threshold.

By Elise Schadauer

Case study focused on favorable CRT optimization of cardiomyopathy patient with limited exertion tolerance; new FDA-approved medical device that provides objective cardiopulmonary gas exchange measurements and real-time physiological assessment to enable CRT optimization during low level exercise easily and quickly without undue strain on the patient

Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN (October 14, 2009) – Presenting to a group of leading physicians and nurses from the heart failure programs in Greater Chicago, Dr. Abraham Kocheril, Professor of Medicine and Director of Clinical Electrophysiology at the University of Illinois at Chicago, together with Dr. Thomas Stamos, Director of Heart Failure at the University of Illinois Medical Center, presented a heart failure patient case study in which the Shape-HF™ Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing System was used to optimize cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). The patient had long-standing cardiomyopathy and had received a pacemaker for heart block. She was later upgraded to a CRT-D because of symptomatic heart failure and poor left ventricular function. The patient’s exertion tolerance was limited by dyspnea. Dr. Kocheril used the Shape-HF device to optimize the patient’s cardiac resynchronization therapy with favorable results. 

By Elise Schadauer

Introduced new objective method for optimizing CRT in heart failure patients

during exercise that may significantly impact outcomes for non-responders

 

Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN (September 17, 2009) – Speaking at the recent Heart Failure Society of America 13th Annual Meeting, September 13 to 16, Dean MacCarter, Ph.D., Vice President Clinical Affairs for Shape Medical Systems, Inc., addressed how breathing efficiency measurements during low level exercise may offer a better discriminator for CRT responder and non-responder outcomes. He also introduced the audience to a new patented method for optimizing therapy in patients with implanted cardiac resynchronization pacemakers. This new method involves using the FDA-approved Shape-HF™ Cardiopulmonary Testing System to measure changes in patient breathing efficiency as cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) pacemaker settings are adjusted. In this way, physicians are able to assess the physiological effect of therapy in real time while the patient is exercising at a level consistent with normal daily activity.  

By Elise Schadauer

FDA-approved medical device provides a solution to an unmet clinical need

to objectively optimize heart failure therapy

 

Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN (September 8, 2009) – Shape Medical Systems, Inc. will be on hand to display its new medical device, the Shape-HF™ Cardiopulmonary Testing System, at the upcoming Heart Failure Society of America 13th Annual Scientific Meeting, beginning September 13, 2009, in Boston. Given that heart failure accounts for 15 million office visits per year and burdens the healthcare system with costs of more than $30 billion, the Shape-HF™ offers a solution to an unmet clinical need to objectively optimize heart failure therapy.

By Elise Schadauer

FDA-approved medical device consistently measured HR, SaO2, VO2, VCO2, Fb, VT, and PetCO2

Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN (August 25, 2009) – All results from a recent Mayo Clinic study validate the measurement accuracy of the Shape-HF™ Cardiopulmonary Testing System.  Data collected by the Shape-HF™ compared favorably to that of the Mayo Clinic Cardiopulmonary Research System and reflected a tight reproducibility of the results. The Shape-HF™ is a new, non-invasive medical device that assesses heart-lung interaction and ventilation in patients with chronic heart failure and other cardiopulmonary disease.

By Elise Schadauer

FDA-approved medical device provides a solution to an unmet clinical need

to objectively optimize heart failure therapy

Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN (June 10, 2009) – Shape Medical Systems, Inc. will be on hand to display its new medical device, the Shape-HF™ Cardiopulmonary Testing System, at the upcoming American Association of Heart Failure Nurses June 25-27 annual meeting in Minneapolis. Given that heart failure accounts for 15 million office visits per year and burdens the healthcare system with costs of more than $30 billion, the Shape-HF™ offers a solution to an unmet clinical need to objectively optimize heart failure therapy.

By Elise Schadauer

The new FDA-approved Shape-HF™ Cardiopulmonary Testing System “can make a dramatic difference in treating CRT patients.” Dr. Abraham Kocheril, Professor of Medicine and Director of Clinical Electrophysiology at the University of Illinois at Chicago

Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN (May 26, 2009) – Speaking to a group of approximately 300 top electrophysiologists, Dean MacCarter, Ph.D., Vice President Clinical Affairs for Shape Medical Systems, Inc., introduced a new, patented method for optimizing therapy in patients with implanted cardiac resynchronization pacemakers at the Heart Rhythm Society’s 30th Annual Scientific Meeting May 13-16 in Boston, MA. This new method involves using the Shape-HF™ Cardiopulmonary Testing System to measure changes in patient breathing efficiency as cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) settings are adjusted. In this way, physicians are able to assess the physiological effect of therapy in real time while the patient is exercising at a level consistent with normal daily activity.  

By Elise Schadauer

New FDA-approved medical device “is specifically designed to objectively measure cardiopulmonary gas exchange in heart failure patients. It can make a dramatic difference in treating CRT patients.” Dr. Abraham Kocheril, Professor of Medicine and Director of Clinical Electrophysiology at the University of Illinois at Chicago

 

Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN (May 6, 2009) – The University of Illinois Medical Center, the primary teaching facility for the UIC College of Medicine (the nation’s largest medical school), is the first such institution to install and begin using the innovative Shape-HF™ Cardiopulmonary Testing System. Developed by Shape Medical Systems, Inc., this non-invasive medical device assesses heart-lung interaction and ventilation in patients with chronic heart failure and other cardiopulmonary disease. While gas exchange testing devices have been used for several years to measure cardiopulmonary response to exercise, Shape-HF™ is the first device specifically designed for cardiology. Shape-HF™ is FDA-approved, easy to use, easy on the patient, and provides clinically relevant data that is easy to understand, reproducible and immediately useful to a cardiologist.